Banks

  • 08 Nov
    Is Everything Now Too Big To Fail?

    Is Everything Now Too Big To Fail?

    • Today, we’ll discuss how the “too big to fail” concept has evolved since it was first used back in 1984.
    • The U.S. stock market to pension funds relation shows that even the stock market is simply too big to fail.
    • In Europe, the situation is even worse. Everything there is too big to fail, from countries to corporations to junk bonds.



    Introduction

    “Too big to fail” is a concept that you probably recognize from the 2009 financial crisis when many corporations, particularly financial institutions, were considered too big to fail due to the negative impact their demise would have on the whole economic system.

    In order to prevent massive negative effects on the economy, and also to prevent a 1930s depression-style situation, governments intervened and bailed out the distressed assets. More →

  • 08 Aug
    Are Stocks & Bonds In A Bubble? Sven Thinks So…

    Are Stocks & Bonds In A Bubble? Sven Thinks So…

    • Earnings have been growing in the last 12 months, but haven’t grown that much over the last 20 years.
    • Even the Swiss central bank owns almost $3 billion worth of Apple’s stock.
    • After the dot-com and the housing bubbles, school books will talk about the central bank bubble in the future.

    Introduction

    All we see right now is the stock market continuing to go up. The S&P 500 is already up 9.7% year to date, and there is no sign that the trend might weaken or reverse. Over the last 8 and a half years, the index is up 242%. More →

  • 28 Dec
    2017 Looks Like Another Excellent Trading Year

    2017 Looks Like Another Excellent Trading Year

    • Rebalancing your portfolio between sectors and markets should lower your risks and increase your returns in 2017.
    • 2016 is an excellent example of how such a strategy works when the general stock market is overvalued.
    • Things like avoiding REITs in August 2016 or entering metals will be easy to spot and act upon, even in 2017.

    Approaching The Current Market Risk Reward Puzzle

    A recent Wall Street Journal article raised the question of whether investors looking to get into the market now are too late for the Dow 20,000 party. Many investors watched the 7-year stock bull market from the side-lines after they got burned during the latest financial crisis and didn’t overcome their anxiety and invest again. The article suggested that investing now is a good thing to do if you are a long-term investor. More →

  • 27 Sep
    Should You Worry About What’s Happening With Deutsche Bank?

    Should You Worry About What’s Happening With Deutsche Bank?

    • European stocks pushed global markets down after the German Chancellor said they will not help Deutsche Bank if it fails.
    • Europe still offers too much risk for the expected return.
    • In this article we’ll share two critical things you have to think about in order to weather all possible storms.

    Introduction

    After a long and quiet summer, stocks are showing increased volatility. Last week’s FED decision not to increase interest rates has quickly been forgotten as markets try to digest news from Europe where increased fears over capital requirements for Deutsche Bank, which sent European markets down on Monday.

    In this article, we’ll assess the depth of the issue and look for the real reasons behind the European 2% market move on Monday morning. More →

  • 01 Jun
    It’s Just Money: Is it Time to Think About Investing in Banks?

    It’s Just Money: Is it Time to Think About Investing in Banks?

    • Banks have excellent fundamentals and low valuations.
    • Increased interest rates mean increased spreads and higher profits.
    • Complying with Basel guidelines lower the risks of another financial crisis.

    Introduction

    Since the great recession investors have been wary of investing in financials as the bankruptcies, bailouts and layoffs left a big mark. This article is going to shed some light on the current banking situation to see if the 2009 debacle was a once in a century happening, or if there are still inherent risks for the US banking sector. More →

    By Sven Carlin Banks Investiv Daily