India

  • 26 Apr
    If You’re An Investor, Now’s The Time To Get Out Of The S&P 500, Index Funds, & ETFs

    If You’re An Investor, Now’s The Time To Get Out Of The S&P 500, Index Funds, & ETFs

    • If you only look at averages, passive investing will always outperform active due to lower fees, but you can only expect average returns.
    • The market is skewed and inefficient due to huge flows into passive funds, outflows from active funds which should be doing the thinking, and euphoric management doing large stock buybacks. This creates a highly risky situation.
    • Avoid owning index funds, ETFs, and stocks that are largely owned by passive funds.

    Introduction

    There are two investing worlds. One is the world of active investing where the fund manager you hired analyzes company after company and invests in those they think are the best. The passive manager simply disperses your funds over an index where you will perform exactly as the market performs. With passive investing, fundamentals, dividends, growth, sales, scandals, and business trends don’t matter at all. More →

  • 24 Apr
    Global Growth Is Finally Getting Some Traction, Be Sure Your Money Follows

    Global Growth Is Finally Getting Some Traction, Be Sure Your Money Follows

    • Macroeconomic trends are extremely important for your investing or trading returns.
    • The IMF’s World Economic Outlook is a great starting point for understanding where the risks and opportunities lie.
    • Long term trends show emerging markets and commodities are the place to be.

    Introduction

    Investing is both difficult and easy. It’s difficult if you try to guess what the market’s sentiment will be next week or next month, while it’s easy if you simply look at slow moving structural macroeconomic trends. These trends are like little forces that shape the market, similar to the gravitational forces among planets in our solar system. More →

  • 16 Mar
    The U.S. Market Is Irrationally Expensive – What Does The Rest Of The World Have To Offer?

    The U.S. Market Is Irrationally Expensive – What Does The Rest Of The World Have To Offer?

    • Global markets are much cheaper, but there’s an even better option.
    • It’s relatively easy to find stocks that have huge growth potential at cheap valuations. I’ll describe three sectors.
    • In the long term, the current trend of favoring the U.S. dollar and equities is going to shift to where the growth is. There’s no doubt about it, so be prepared.

    Introduction

    The U.S. equity market is like driving a luxury car. It’s reliable (low volatility or as some say, low risk), costs you a bit more to maintain (low dividends), it makes you look good (investing with the big boys), and it will eventually bring you to where you want to go.

    Investing in emerging markets is like driving a cheap car. Nobody considers your investments cool (looking for bargains in unknown areas like Russia, China, or India), the car won’t be as reliable (break down more often – think volatility), but it will be cheap to repair (high dividends), and eventually will also bring you to where you want to go. More →

  • 27 Oct
    A Global Risk Reward Perspective

    A Global Risk Reward Perspective

    • Emerging markets will grow faster than advanced economies, but there are many investing risks.
    • If a currency is at risk of being devalued 50% against the US dollar, over a decade you’d need an additional 7% yearly return to cover for it.
    • It is less risky to invest in emerging markets when there is pessimism than when there is euphoria.

    Introduction

    The World Bank revised its 2016 global economic growth forecast down to 2.4 percent from the 2.9 percent pace projected in January. The main reason for this downward revision came from lower commodity prices globally and soft investments in developed countries. But what’s important here is the divergence between the growth in emerging versus developed economies. More →

  • 12 Oct
    The Best Way To Invest In India

    The Best Way To Invest In India

    • Indian economic, demographic, and social factors indicate a China-like boom for the country.
    • Indian equities aren’t that cheap at the moment, but look cheap given the potential.
    • There is another option: buy cheap stocks of companies that are exposed to India.

    Introduction

    The U.S. stock market has been one of the best performing stock markets globally in the last 50 years. Its best performance was from 1980 to 2000 when the market went from 100 points to 1500 points creating a 15 bagger (increasing your investment 15 times), and all this without calculating dividends. More →

  • 15 Sep
    Troubled Waters Ahead For Developed Markets. Look Here For Returns.

    Troubled Waters Ahead For Developed Markets. Look Here For Returns.

    • Europe and Germany aren’t the best places for international diversification right now.
    • The U.S. is looking a bit better, but you’ll find the best opportunities are mostly in emerging markets.
    • Look for companies that are relatively cheap and that have exposure to China, India, and/or Brazil.

    Introduction

    Two days ago we discussed what is going on in the markets in relation to monetary policies. Today we will discuss what is going on in global economics.

    As the market is showing a high level of volatility, basic economic fundamentals is where we should look to get answers on what to do. By analyzing the latest global economic indicators, we can better determine the risk of a recession in the U.S. and Europe or a slowdown in China, all of which could contribute to a decline in global markets. More →

  • 29 Aug
    If You’re Thinking About Global Diversification, You Should Read This

    If You’re Thinking About Global Diversification, You Should Read This

    • The developed world is depending, and will continue to depend, more and more on the developing world.
    • The focus of productivity and GDP growth is in Asia.
    • The U.S. is the only country with trade deficits since 1976.

    Introduction

    Nobody knows where the market will go in the next week, month, or year, but what can give investors an edge is to look at macro trends that are bound to influence economies and returns on investments.

    In this article we are going to analyze productivity and trade balances among the most important global economic powers, and try to derive a long term trend from it in order to improve the international exposure in our portfolios. More →

  • 16 Aug
    Emerging Markets Are Hot – Here Is Where You Should Put Your Money

    Emerging Markets Are Hot – Here Is Where You Should Put Your Money

    • Emerging markets are up 10% since our last article on the subject, but the FED’s rate action might quickly erase the gains.
    • Valuations are starting to diverge, but don’t fight the trend.
    • Keep an eye on China as it is relatively undervalued and still boosts economic growth of 6.7%.

    Introduction

    In May we discussed how emerging markets have been rediscovered but are still undervalued. Since then, the emerging markets ETF is up 10%. More →

  • 26 May
    The Elephant In The Room – Is India The New China?

    The Elephant In The Room – Is India The New China?

    • The Indian economy is growing at 7% and the demographics are still very positive.
    • The market is overvalued from a global perspective but the growth should remedy that.
    • Investment exposure to India can be achieved by investing directly in ADRs or ETFs.

    Introduction

    A country often dwarfed by its northern neighbor and still not perceived by the investment community as significant is India. As most news is about China, this article is going to give a perspective on the investment potential India offers. More →

    By Sven Carlin India Investiv Daily