ECB

  • 13 Nov
    Inflation Points To A Recession On The Horizon – Here’s What You Need To Know

    Inflation Points To A Recession On The Horizon – Here’s What You Need To Know

    • Everybody expected high inflation after 2009, but it didn’t happen. There are specific reasons for that.
    • However, higher food and energy prices are pushing inflation higher. The low unemployment rate should help too.
    • Today, I’ll discuss how to best position yourself for an inflationary environment.



    Introduction

    There is one little bell always ringing in my mind: inflation, inflation, inflation.

    From all my analysis, inflation is something that could really shock the financial world. In today’s article, I’ll first show the current inflation levels for the most important economies, and then will dig deeper into what can happen in the next few years and how could that affect your portfolio. More →

  • 16 Aug
    Why You Need To Prepare For All Hell To Break Loose

    Why You Need To Prepare For All Hell To Break Loose

    • The last stock bull market was influenced by central bank activity, that’s clear. What’s next is the question.
    • I’ll describe three potential scenarios that could impact our financial system.
    • One is good, the second is interesting, while the third is ugly.

    Introduction

    The general expectation is that the FED will start selling securities in order to tighten monetary policy, that the ECB will slowly stop buying, and that nothing will change in Japan. Nevertheless, such a situation would lead to an environment where the additional liquidity created by central banks finally dries up. As the liquidity provided by central banks is the main reason behind this bull market, should investors begin to cut their positions?

    In order to elaborate on this question, we’ll first analyze the situation, the expected situation, and then possible scenarios in order to give you the best answer on how to prepare yourself for what might happen. It’s extremely important to do so and, as you will see, it isn’t that difficult. More →

  • 08 Aug
    Are Stocks & Bonds In A Bubble? Sven Thinks So…

    Are Stocks & Bonds In A Bubble? Sven Thinks So…

    • Earnings have been growing in the last 12 months, but haven’t grown that much over the last 20 years.
    • Even the Swiss central bank owns almost $3 billion worth of Apple’s stock.
    • After the dot-com and the housing bubbles, school books will talk about the central bank bubble in the future.

    Introduction

    All we see right now is the stock market continuing to go up. The S&P 500 is already up 9.7% year to date, and there is no sign that the trend might weaken or reverse. Over the last 8 and a half years, the index is up 242%. More →

  • 31 Jul
    Europe Is Verging On Communism. Investors Beware.

    Europe Is Verging On Communism. Investors Beware.

    • I’ll describe what communism is and how close Europe is to it.
    • I’ll analyze the implications the current monetary environment will have on investments in Europe and the European currency.
    • You can’t compete with a European company that borrows at negative interest rates.

    Introduction

    Now, the title of today’s article is a pretty heavy statement, but let’s look at the definition of communism and what’s currently going on in Europe to see how far Europe is from actually being communist. More →

  • 26 Jul
    Central Banks Have Made The Rich Richer. Here’s How To Take Advantage.

    Central Banks Have Made The Rich Richer. Here’s How To Take Advantage.

    • Central banks have intentionally inflated asset prices that benefit those who own assets, while wages and real prices have remained equal.
    • There’s no case for being a saver. The risks are too high for miserable returns.
    • I’ll discuss three options to protect yourself and take advantage of the next quantitative easing rounds.

    Introduction

    In the last 10 years, the financial environment has changed significantly. You might not see it in your everyday life, but the 2007 environment and the environment today are hugely different. The wealth effect hasn’t really worked as Central Banks had planned and has significantly skewed asset values compared to fundamentals.

    In today’s article, I’ll describe what happened, compare it to what the previous situation was, show who benefited from the significant monetary policy market intrusions, and who will keep benefiting in the future to find ways to take advantage of the situation. More →

  • 10 Jul
    The FED & ECB Meeting Minutes Explained

    The FED & ECB Meeting Minutes Explained

    • Financial markets are very dependent on Central Bank activity.
    • The FED is slowly tightening, but the activity is more a façade than actual tightening. Europe is still easing.
    • The fact is that things will eventually change. When? Nobody knows. The only thing a savvy investor can do is protect themselves and take advantage of everything.

    Introduction

    Many don’t see that the current market is highly influenced by Central Banks.

    In the past 8 years, Central Banks have been continually putting money into the system. The FED has recently stopped doing so, but the ECB is still buying bonds, even corporate bonds, while the Bank of Japan has bought almost everything they can buy. So, it’s clear that high current asset prices are a direct result of Central Bank actions as the fundamentals haven’t really improved as much as asset prices have increased.

    The long-term picture is relatively easy to understand, but I must say, I was surprised by the short-term correlations between Central Bank activity and stock prices. More →

  • 09 Feb
    Europe Is A Long Term Ticking Time Bomb

    Europe Is A Long Term Ticking Time Bomb

    • Europe is made up of many countries, which means there are even more politicians that just want to get reelected creating an immense short term attitude.
    • Don’t buy Europe just because it underperformed the S&P 500, and don’t buy European debt at single digit yields.
    • Tightening won’t work as many countries have an average debt to GDP ratio above 85%, therefore there is a high chance that the Euro remains weak for longer.

    Introduction

    The IMF just reported that the situation in Greece is getting better, but the debt is unsustainable. This contradictory as it implies a long term catastrophe and short term positivity. I’m flabbergasted on a daily basis by the incapacity or unwillingness of the financial world and monetary institutions to look at the long term.

    That’s why I’m here. To warn you about impending catastrophes and perhaps even increase your returns in the process. More →