Inflation

  • 20 Jan
    The Long & Short Term Outlook For Bonds Is Scary At Best

    The Long & Short Term Outlook For Bonds Is Scary At Best

    • As we are still far away from the FED’s target interest rate, bonds have plenty more room to fall.
    • Inflation could force the FED to hike rates and push bonds down very quickly.
    • This is probably the end of the 35-year bond bull market that has beaten the S&P 500 by five times.

    Introduction

    I haven’t written about bonds since back in July when I said that bonds were extremely risky (article available here).

    Unfortunately for bond holders, my call was prescient to the point of perfection because yields went up and consequently bonds prices went down. More →

  • 12 Jan
    The Edge Of The Cliff No One Wants To See: A Look At The Economic Cycle & Debt

    The Edge Of The Cliff No One Wants To See: A Look At The Economic Cycle & Debt

    • The economic recovery hasn’t lowered debt levels while interest rates are starting to increase.
    • Expect lower consumer, corporate, and government spending.
    • When you invest, please be aware of what is described below.

    Introduction

    Nature works in cycles, there is winter, summer, drought, rain, monsoons, a year with mosquitos, one without, El Niño, La Niña, a good crop, bad crop, etc. As we are part of nature, cyclicality is inherent to our behavior and our behavior is reflected in the economy as we are the economy.

    It’s important to continually analyze and mark where we are in the economic cycle in order to have a better perspective on how to position ourselves as investors. Most analysts and financial professionals look in the rear-view mirror to predict the future and then focus on only one year. This is because it doesn’t pay to look beyond a year as it would force them to tell the truth and consequently lower their selling commissions because not many would invest if they knew that there was a risk of losing 50% of their investment in the next few years. More →

  • 09 Jan
    Sven Thinks You Can Be A Millionaire & Tells You How To Get There

    Sven Thinks You Can Be A Millionaire & Tells You How To Get There

    • Investing for the long term isn’t hard and if you avoid doing stupid things, you should expect to be a millionaire when you retire or likely even sooner.
    • Maximize your IRA as it isn’t taxed.
    • Beating the market by a few percentage points leads to staggering differences in 30 years.

    Introduction

    People usually wonder how much money they should put aside and invest in stocks. Should it be 5%, 10% or 15% of your income? Should you put any lump sums into the stock market or not?

    As most of us don’t have clear plans and goals, what happens is that investors invest more when they should invest less and nothing at all when they should go all-in.

    Today’s article will describe the expected end result from investing in stocks, how much your investments will return on average, and how to create a stable strategy in order to not make costly mistakes. More →

  • 21 Dec
    Should You Invest In Russia? Sven Tells You Why It Might Not Be Such A Good Bet

    Should You Invest In Russia? Sven Tells You Why It Might Not Be Such A Good Bet

    • The numbers make Russia the cheapest global market.
    • However, most of the market is made up of energy and financials, while normal companies are fairly priced.
    • Long term economics in Russia aren’t positive as the country is completely dependent on oil prices.

    Russia As An Investment Opportunity

    Russia has been the best performing market year-to-date and is up 50%. However, it’s still considered by many in the financial environment as one of the cheapest global markets as it’s still far from the pre-sanction and higher oil prices levels of a few years ago. More →

  • 16 Dec
    Why You Might Want To Start Dollar Cost Averaging Precious Metals

    Why You Might Want To Start Dollar Cost Averaging Precious Metals

    • Central banks’ balance sheets have quadrupled in the last decade.
    • Balance sheets will continue to balloon as there isn’t another option for economic growth in developed countries.
    • You should start to think about protecting yourself from inflationary pressures now, when such fears seem distant and unlikely. It’s the cheapest time to do it.

    Introduction

    Yesterday we discussed the three drivers that could push markets higher if all other factors like interest rates, risk perceptions, and global political issues stay as they are now. However, we didn’t discuss what happens if the underlying pillars that have been holding up global financial markets since the Great Recession change. Today we’ll discuss what could change and how to properly diversify. More →

  • 15 Dec
    This Could Push The S&P Even Higher

    This Could Push The S&P Even Higher

    • The market looks overvalued but there are three main factors that could push it even higher.
    • A repatriation tax holiday could make $2.1 trillion available for dividends, buybacks, and M&As.
    • Economic growth and inflation could push earnings higher, further inflating stock prices.

    Introduction

    It seems that everyone agrees on the fact that this market is overvalued and borderline irrational. However, there is no correction in sight and the only question to be asked is “how high can this market go?”

    The S&P 500 has jumped 5.4% since Trump won the elections, and is 12.1% higher year-to-date. By adding in the 2% dividend yield, we arrive at an excellent 14% return for 2016. This year’s positive return will make it number eight in a row for the S&P 500 as it has been rewarding investors since 2009. More →

  • 09 Nov
    The Economics Are Great, But Valuations Point Toward Stock Picking To Limit Risk

    The Economics Are Great, But Valuations Point Toward Stock Picking To Limit Risk

    • GDP, productivity and earnings are growing which is great news.
    • However, valuations are high and interest rates are likely to rise soon.
    • Given the variations in revenue and earnings growth, and the upcoming changes in interest rates, now may be the time to switch from index investing to stock picking.

    Introduction

    As the earnings season is almost over—and GDP, productivity and labor data is in—it’s a good time to look at what kind of conclusions can be made out of the multitude of information. By putting the noise aside (the election) and focusing on news that impacts future earnings, we’ll relate recent developments to the potential risks and rewards for your portfolio. More →

  • 01 Nov
    GDP Is Up But Stocks Are Down – How You Should Respond

    GDP Is Up But Stocks Are Down – How You Should Respond

    • Inflation is approaching 2% as the current dollar GDP has increased to 4.4%.
    • Both inflation and GDP growth will force the FED to take action – the selloff in yielding assets will continue.
    • Nondurables consumption leads to GDP growth alongside exports and inventories buildups questioning GDP growth sustainability.

    Introduction

    Last Friday, the Bureau of Economic Analysis released the GDP data for Q3 2016. At first, it looked surprisingly good with the GDP growing at an annual rate of 2.9% for the quarter. This is excellent news as it takes the economy out of its anemic growth rhythm seen in the last two years. More →

  • 18 Oct
    Investing Advice From John Maynard Keynes

    Investing Advice From John Maynard Keynes

    • It’s good to invest for the long run, but don’t let that be an excuse for investing in overvalued stocks as in the long run, we all die.
    • Often shunned as irrelevant, inflation must be considered when investing.
    • Markets are irrational and get more irrational as people think less. ETFs are the perfect example.

    Introduction

    You probably remember Keynes from Economics 101 as his ideas fundamentally changed the way people looked at economics in the first part of the 20th century. Before Keynes, a laissez-faire (let people do as they choose) economy with low or no government involvement, was the norm.

    By studying the causes of business cycles, Keynes came to the conclusion that government intervention is necessary to moderate boom and bust cycles in an economy. He endorsed the New Deal in a letter to President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1933, and the New Deal remains a perfect example of his theories. More →

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