Market Forecast

  • 24 Feb
    Goldman Sachs Is Probably Right But Is It Worth The Risk?

    Goldman Sachs Is Probably Right But Is It Worth The Risk?

    • Goldman Sachs recommends being overweight U.S. equities because of expected loose fiscal policies and because, as they have stated, valuations don’t matter.
    • Goldman expects a 3% yearly return on a moderate risk portfolio.
    • I’ll touch on what the average Goldman client is risking for their 3% yearly return.

    Introduction

    Goldman Sachs (NYSE: GS) recently released its 2017 market outlook. It shouldn’t be a surprise that the outlook is positive. It’s in their interest for stocks and the economy to continue to thrive as GS makes its money from IPO commissions, asset management fees, etc.

    Despite the conflict of interest, their positive outlook will most probably be correct at the end of 2017, but there is something more important than being right or wrong on a yearly forecast.

    Today we’ll discuss Goldman’s view and analyze the possible impacts on our portfolios. More →

  • 09 Feb
    Europe Is A Long Term Ticking Time Bomb

    Europe Is A Long Term Ticking Time Bomb

    • Europe is made up of many countries, which means there are even more politicians that just want to get reelected creating an immense short term attitude.
    • Don’t buy Europe just because it underperformed the S&P 500, and don’t buy European debt at single digit yields.
    • Tightening won’t work as many countries have an average debt to GDP ratio above 85%, therefore there is a high chance that the Euro remains weak for longer.

    Introduction

    The IMF just reported that the situation in Greece is getting better, but the debt is unsustainable. This contradictory as it implies a long term catastrophe and short term positivity. I’m flabbergasted on a daily basis by the incapacity or unwillingness of the financial world and monetary institutions to look at the long term.

    That’s why I’m here. To warn you about impending catastrophes and perhaps even increase your returns in the process. More →

  • 08 Feb
    Dow 60,000 In The Next 10 Years?!?

    Dow 60,000 In The Next 10 Years?!?

    • Earnings estimations tell us that the S&P 500 will reach 6,471 and the Dow 59,000 points in 10 years.
    • A bad case scenario with current earnings growth would see the S&P 500 at 3,589 points while the Dow, which just passed 20,000 points, would be at 31,415 points.
    • We’ll compare a short-term and a long-term perspective on earnings.
    • Only two times in history have valuations grown alongside earnings, and the results are extremely indicative.

    Introduction

    Earnings are the oxygen of our investments. Therefore, it’s extremely important to keep an eye on what is going on.

    A short-term and long-term perspective on recent earnings reports is going to tell us how to position ourselves for 2017 and beyond. More →

  • 06 Feb
    Sven Sees Recession On The Horizon

    Sven Sees Recession On The Horizon

    • An analysis of employment, interest rates, currency, and inflation suggests a recession is inevitable in the next few years.
    • The FED can’t change economic laws nor protect us from ourselves. On the contrary, the FED will lead us into a recession in order to prevent a future depression.

    Introduction

    The FED didn’t raise rates last Wednesday but they are still on track to raise rates two to three times in 2017. The FED’s goal is to “foster maximum employment and price stability” through economic activity expanding at a moderate pace and inflation rising to, and stabilizing at 2%.

    What we know is that inflation has been slowly rising and will reach 2% relatively soon. The labor market is strong and yields have been increasing in the expectation of higher interest rates.

    A concept that always eludes economists, consequently also members of the FED, is stability. By looking at a model, an economist is trained to think that the economy can be controlled. But history shows that a stable scenario is never the case. In today’s article, I’ll forecast what lies ahead of us by looking at how the last two economic cycles developed. More →

  • 30 Jan
    There’s Buzz Around Cobalt But Don’t Buy Yet

    There’s Buzz Around Cobalt But Don’t Buy Yet

    • The cobalt hype reminds me of the 2008 uranium and 2011 rare earth element spikes. Both ended badly for investors.
    • The bull case is tempting, but you should always investigate mining costs of junior miners because the cheapest way to get to cobalt is as a by-product, and there are big copper mines that can supply it.
    • Be careful of dilutive capital raises, liquidity issues, and stock liquidity and all other issues that penny stocks have, no matter how attractive the cobalt pitch might seem.

    Introduction

    Many of you might be wondering what’s going on with cobalt as its price has gone up lately which has created an interesting buzz in the financial world.

    On top of it, many mention cobalt alongside sexy names like Tesla (NASDAQ: TSLA) which further increases the buzz.

    Today I’ll shed some light on cobalt in order to see if there is a long term profitable trend forming in its supply and demand, or if it’s just a fad like rare earths, graphite, or uranium were back in their days. More →

  • 24 Jan
    Will Your Portfolio Explode Or Implode? A Look At Uranium

    Will Your Portfolio Explode Or Implode? A Look At Uranium

    • The short and medium term don’t look that great for uranium as military inventories, idled reactors, and negative sentiment push prices down.
    • In the long term, increased demand from new nuclear reactors should eventually push prices higher and may create tremendous returns given the current low investment environment – think 3 to 10 years.
    • In the long-long term, there is plenty of uranium for the next thousand years.

    Introduction

    Uranium has been in a five-year long price slump with several factors having impacted the decline.

    The 2011 Fukushima disaster forced Japan to idle its reactors. According to the Nuclear Energy Institute, only three reactors of the 42 commercially operable are currently in use in Japan. As Japan represents one third of global nuclear capacity, this blow was tremendous for uranium. More →

  • 20 Jan
    The Long & Short Term Outlook For Bonds Is Scary At Best

    The Long & Short Term Outlook For Bonds Is Scary At Best

    • As we are still far away from the FED’s target interest rate, bonds have plenty more room to fall.
    • Inflation could force the FED to hike rates and push bonds down very quickly.
    • This is probably the end of the 35-year bond bull market that has beaten the S&P 500 by five times.

    Introduction

    I haven’t written about bonds since back in July when I said that bonds were extremely risky (article available here).

    Unfortunately for bond holders, my call was prescient to the point of perfection because yields went up and consequently bonds prices went down. More →

  • 10 Jan
    Don’t Be Fooled By Projections

    Don’t Be Fooled By Projections

    • Forecasts are extremely positive, but know that a bear market or a recession are never in the picture.
    • Of all the S&P 500 ratings, 49% are Buy ratings, 45% are Hold ratings, and 6% are Sell ratings.
    • Be sure to understand the risks of what you’re doing and know history. It may not repeat itself but it rhymes.

    Introduction

    Market bulls base their positivity on strong earnings and economic growth in 2017. However, analysts are usually very optimistic about future developments. But as the forecasted events come closer, most of them cut their estimations.

    Similarly to what analysts do, policy makers are also usually very positive about future economic developments. We could say that positivity is in their job descriptions. More →

  • 05 Jan
    If You Don’t Own Gold, You Know Neither History Nor Economics

    If You Don’t Own Gold, You Know Neither History Nor Economics

    • The bull case for gold is getting stronger for monetary, fundamental, and technical reasons.
    • Gold miners offer a positive asymmetric risk reward opportunity.
    • However, in the short term, anything is possible.

    Introduction

    I’ve borrowed the title of today’s article from Ray Dalio, the manager of the $150 billion Bridgewater hedge fund.

    Historically I have been against owning gold as it is not a yielding asset. However, after seeing how the global monetary base expands and will probably expand further when the next recession comes along, it’s a good time to contemplate an investment in gold as a hedge against human stupidity and greed.

    Today, I’ll elaborate on the bull case for gold, the risks, investment options, and why I think some of those options have extremely positive asymmetric risks. More →

  • 04 Jan
    Fundamentals & Sentiment: Sven Dissects 1,626 U.S. Stocks

    Fundamentals & Sentiment: Sven Dissects 1,626 U.S. Stocks

    • It is possible to build a well-diversified portfolio with low PE ratio stocks that have equal the growth of high PE ratio stocks.
    • Short exposure and analysts’ targets indicate the market is in a very positive mode.
    • The market is extremely short term focused. We’ll identify where to look to find the opportunities.

    Introduction

    Using data from Quant, I’ve analyzed 1,626 U.S. stocks.

    The factors I’ve analyzed are: market capitalization, current and forward PE ratios, price to book value, dividend yield, percentage short, analysts’ targets, 52-week highs and lows, and earnings per share growth.

    The goal of this analysis is to provide insight into how to beat the market in 2017. I believe that research, thorough analysis, and patience will always outperform the market, especially because the distribution of the above-mentioned factors is all over the place as you will see below. More →

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