Valuations

  • 07 Mar
    The Superinvestors Of Graham And Doddsville – Is Buffett A Hypocrite?

    The Superinvestors Of Graham And Doddsville – Is Buffett A Hypocrite?

    • According to Warren Buffet in 1984, investing and beating the market is simple: just use value investing and a margin of safety.
    • For this market, value investing is irrelevant. However if things change, value investing will become essential.
    • Spoiler alert: What I’ve written in this article you will either immediately like or totally disregard. Unfortunately, the latter will have a negative impact on your wealth.

    Introduction

    One short, 15-page article holds more investing insight than all the content published by the media in a year. It’s Warren Buffett’s article The Superinvestors of Graham and Doddsville.

    As the article was written in 1984, it gives you the real, non-political and unconstrained Buffett. Today’s Buffet is a hypocrite because he is forced to say index funds are a good investment even though stocks are at valuations he would never approve of. He has become so big that anything opposite to positive statements would lead to a possible market meltdown. Plus, don’t be confused by the fact that he recently bought $12 billion of stocks, as he bought into extremely cheap sectors, you can read more about that here.

    Today, I’ll summarize Buffett’s article and put it into today’s context. More →

  • 06 Mar
    The Market Is Euphoric – It’s Time To Get Rid Of Your Overvalued Stocks

    The Market Is Euphoric – It’s Time To Get Rid Of Your Overvalued Stocks

    • Market timing is tricky because if you missed the best 40 days in the last 20 years, your annual returns quickly turn from positive 8.19% to negative -1.96%.
    • But the fact remains that we are looking at a euphoric market with shaky economic foundations.
    • You don’t have to get out of the market. Getting out of overvalued stocks should suffice.

    Introduction

    With every new high reached by the DOW or the S&P 500, the market gets riskier. However, I don’t want to be another analyst that just predicts doom and gloom so today I want to discuss the best risk reward allocation and what an investor can do in these exciting but risky times. More →

  • 28 Feb
    The Snapchat IPO Tells Me Two Things

    The Snapchat IPO Tells Me Two Things

    • The market is greedy and liquid. This is a very dangerous combination as valuations don’t matter, but what’s cool does.
    • It’s easy to forget that, in investing, it’s more important not to lose than to make it big, and by playing the greater fool roulette, investors can lose a lot.
    • It’s a mystery how some companies that are cool and with $2.2 billion in net profits trade at valuations of 16.5.

    Introduction

    Reuters reported that the Snapchat Inc. IPO is oversubscribed as potential buyers have been plentiful at lunches in New York and London during last week’s road show. Snapchat plans to sell 200 million non-voting shares of which 55 million are from company insiders for an estimated $3.2 billion which would bring the company’s market capitalization to over $22 billion. More →

  • 24 Feb
    Goldman Sachs Is Probably Right But Is It Worth The Risk?

    Goldman Sachs Is Probably Right But Is It Worth The Risk?

    • Goldman Sachs recommends being overweight U.S. equities because of expected loose fiscal policies and because, as they have stated, valuations don’t matter.
    • Goldman expects a 3% yearly return on a moderate risk portfolio.
    • I’ll touch on what the average Goldman client is risking for their 3% yearly return.

    Introduction

    Goldman Sachs (NYSE: GS) recently released its 2017 market outlook. It shouldn’t be a surprise that the outlook is positive. It’s in their interest for stocks and the economy to continue to thrive as GS makes its money from IPO commissions, asset management fees, etc.

    Despite the conflict of interest, their positive outlook will most probably be correct at the end of 2017, but there is something more important than being right or wrong on a yearly forecast.

    Today we’ll discuss Goldman’s view and analyze the possible impacts on our portfolios. More →

  • 08 Feb
    Dow 60,000 In The Next 10 Years?!?

    Dow 60,000 In The Next 10 Years?!?

    • Earnings estimations tell us that the S&P 500 will reach 6,471 and the Dow 59,000 points in 10 years.
    • A bad case scenario with current earnings growth would see the S&P 500 at 3,589 points while the Dow, which just passed 20,000 points, would be at 31,415 points.
    • We’ll compare a short-term and a long-term perspective on earnings.
    • Only two times in history have valuations grown alongside earnings, and the results are extremely indicative.

    Introduction

    Earnings are the oxygen of our investments. Therefore, it’s extremely important to keep an eye on what is going on.

    A short-term and long-term perspective on recent earnings reports is going to tell us how to position ourselves for 2017 and beyond. More →

  • 19 Jan
    Analysts Have It All Wrong On Tesla

    Analysts Have It All Wrong On Tesla

    • In order to justify current market valuations, Tesla should increase car sales at least 12-fold, but there aren’t any sell recommendations for the company.
    • GM has a market capitalization per vehicle sold that is 79 times lower than Tesla’s.
    • Analysts are extremely exuberant about the market and are misleading investors. A better risk reward model is necessary in order to prevent tragic investment situations.

    Introduction

    As we are in the eighth year of this wonderful bull market, investors, analysts, and asset managers spend much more time analyzing potential rewards than analyzing risk because we easily forget to think about risk which is in opposition to Warren Buffet’s first and second rule of investing:

    “Rule No.1: Never lose money. Rule No.2: Never forget rule No.1.”

    Not losing money means we should spend more time analyzing risk than we should on analyzing potential future investment rewards. Unfortunately, this is neither fun nor cool, and demands high levels of discipline, a very cyclical and long term perspective on investing with strong self-awareness, and confidence in what you’re doing so as to not just follow the crowd. More →

  • 17 Oct
    Why A Market Crash Could Be Just Around The Corner

    Why A Market Crash Could Be Just Around The Corner

    • We’ll discuss some risks first and then discuss potential rewards.
    • Valuations are the tipping point toward a riskier perspective.
    • After reading this article you’ll be able to decide for yourself what the best strategy is for you to follow.

    Introduction

    In order to see where the market is going, let us first take a look at what the market has been doing in the last two years.

    The market has had a 7% yearly return if we look at it from October 15, 2014, however, if we wait a month, the yearly return for the last two years will fall to 1.8% per year. 1.8% a year plus a dividend yield of 2% isn’t bad in the current low yield environment, but it is bad when compared to the risks stock investors are running. More →

  • 20 Sep
    7 Years In & Valuations Matter More Now Than Ever Before

    7 Years In & Valuations Matter More Now Than Ever Before

    • Volatility can tell you when to buy, but valuations tell you when to sell.
    • In the 2000s, faster than expected earnings growth, low transaction costs and reduced risks from lower volatility were considered factors of the “New Era” for stocks.
    • These days, low interest rates and low inflation are new factors that create the “New Era,” while the PE ratios just grow and grow. Does this sound familiar?

    Introduction

    Apart from professionals, you rarely find investors who are passionate enough about their investments to make it their day-to-day and weather through the peaks and troughs in the market.

    There are many traders, especially young ones, who were unaware of what stocks were back in 2009 that now believe they are the kings of the world as a result of the tailwinds of the current bull market. In such an environment, valuations are ignored and investors become euphoric which makes them believe, for example, that the merging of Tesla and Solar City is a good idea, or that Facebook will have everlasting growth. In reality, our “new normal” is one of negative interest rates and low yields. More →

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