Warren Buffett

  • 15 Aug
    Is It Possible To Find A Wonderful Business At a Fair Price In Today’s Environment?

    Is It Possible To Find A Wonderful Business At a Fair Price In Today’s Environment?

    • We’ll first define what a wonderful business should be and what a fair price would be in relation to general stock market risk.
    • We’ll look at price earnings differences among sectors and countries to find places to look for great investments.
    • A list of S&P 500 companies with low P/E ratios shows that it isn’t easy to find wonderful businesses at a fair price.

    Introduction

    Warren Buffett’s main advice to investors is to find a wonderful business at a fair price. Now with the S&P 500 price to earnings (P/E) ratio of 24.34, that implies an earnings yield of just 4.1% which makes me ask myself, is it possible to find a wonderful business at a fair price today?

    I’ll first describe what a wonderful business is, look at what would be a fair price for it, and then look to see if there are any such businesses around. More →

  • 20 Jul
    Sven’s List Of The Five Books Every Investor & Trader Should Read

    Sven’s List Of The Five Books Every Investor & Trader Should Read

    I love books on investing, and find them to be the best possible investment. For just a few bucks, you can get the synthesized knowledge of the most successful investors. On top of that, many also discuss their mistakes, which are an even more valuable source of learning.

    So with that, today I’ll the list the books on my list that I think every investor or trader should read alongside a short commentary. More →

  • 13 Jul
    This Is What Could Happen To Berkshire Hathaway After Buffett

    This Is What Could Happen To Berkshire Hathaway After Buffett

    • BRK’s companies aren’t reliant on Buffett when it comes to their performance.
    • Buffett leaving leads to two uncertainties, but the outcome of both are positive.
    • The power of BRK lies in the quality of its businesses and huge cash pile. At this point, even an idiot at the helm of BRK would do well.

    Introduction

    One of the biggest concerns surrounding Berkshire Hathaway (NYSE: BRK.A, BRK.B) is what will happen after Buffett and Munger.

    To keep our karma positive, I’ll write this article under the assumption that Buffett gets an offer from Bill Gates to be the project manager of Microsoft’s (NASDAQ: MSFT) new multi-billion virtual reality Bridge game project. I think something like this could make Buffett leave BRK as I wish him many more decades of health. More →

  • 03 Jul
    Why Buffett Bought Store Capital & What We Can Learn From It

    Why Buffett Bought Store Capital & What We Can Learn From It

    • Analyzing Buffett’s purchase can give us excellent insight into how good investments can be found in any environment.
    • STOR still offers a 7.7% AFFO yield for 2017, a 5% dividend yield, and expected growth of over 5% per year.
    • REITs’ performance is closely related to interest rates, but when you find one where the yield is satisfying and the risk is low for your portfolio, well, then you don’t have to care much about what’s going on in the economy or with interest rates.

    Introduction

    If you’ve been reading Investiv Daily for a while, you know I’m always using Warren Buffett as an example of investing excellence.

    Buffett has been doing the same simple things over and over again for the last 52-years, thus since present management took over at Berkshire Hathaway (NYSE: BRK.A, BRK.B), and has been extremely successful with average yearly gains of 19% compared to the S&P 500’s 9.7% with dividends.

    So when Warren Buffett buys a specific stock, it’s important to analyze the purchase in order to learn as much as possible from it. More →

  • 28 Jun
    The 3 Rules To Achieving 10% (Or Higher) Yearly Returns

    The 3 Rules To Achieving 10% (Or Higher) Yearly Returns

    • Achieving 10% per years is pretty simple, just follow three rules.
    • Many forget to include risk in the 10% expected return puzzle.
    • However, if you do your homework, yearly dividend yields of above 60% shouldn’t be excluded. An example will be provided.

    Introduction

    I always talk about how the S&P 500 is overvalued and how everybody should achieve returns of more than 10% per year.

    In fact, I strongly believe that anyone is easily capable of achieving such returns. To achieve returns, say, in the higher teens, you’d need to be a very good investor or have someone telling you what stocks to buy and when. But that puts us in the Buffett, Soros, Klarman, and Dalio category, so we’ll stick with the easy today and discuss how to achieve returns of above 10% per year. More →

  • 21 Jun
    Diversification vs. Concentration

    Diversification vs. Concentration

    • Index funds and diversification have worked extremely well in the past 35 years, however their success can be thanked to geography, as we hear only about the success in the U.S., and to declining interest rates.
    • If the S&P 500 had the same earnings yield as when the Vanguard fund gained traction, it would be at 557 points, yes 77% below current levels.
    • It’s better to wait in cash than buy a diversified index fund now.

    Introduction

    Some investment gurus advocate spreading your portfolio across various asset classes in order to limit your risks for the same return. On the other hand, others say diversification is for idiots and for those who don’t know what they’re doing. I’ll analyze their arguments and see what the best option is for you. More →

  • 02 Jun
    Should You Follow What Hedge Fund Managers Are Doing?

    Should You Follow What Hedge Fund Managers Are Doing?

    • I’ll describe in detail how you can follow hedge fund managers.
    • It’s very important to understand the risk reward profile of the fund manager.
    • Following allows us to find great investment ideas, but there are also big traps.

    Introduction

    Every fund has to disclose its portfolio to the SEC quarterly in a 13F form which allows us to track hedge fund managers’ portfolios. It’s easy to track what George Soros, David Tepper, Seth Klarman, Dan Loeb, Carl Icahn, David Einhorn, Bill Ackman, Warren Buffett, and many, many other interesting investment stars have been doing. The data is usually disclosed 45 days after the end of the quarter, but nevertheless shows what these guys have been doing.

    When you see the research power all those funds use, you might think it’s an excellent free lunch. Well, it could be, but there are a few things to be careful of. More →

  • 26 May
    Corporate America’s Focus Isn’t On Shareholder Value Creation

    Corporate America’s Focus Isn’t On Shareholder Value Creation

    • Earnings haven’t grown in the last 10 years. What is corporate management doing?
    • A temporarily higher stock price isn’t good for the majority of investors, especially those investing for the long term and retirement.
    • Buybacks are idiotic, management pays $ 3million for a home they can build for $1 million.
    • There is only one company that does smart buybacks.

    Introduction

    There’s a huge problem affecting corporate America that nobody is seeing because most people think in positives and negatives, and can’t think on an relative scale. What do I mean by this? Well, when shareholders judge management, they look at whether the bottom line is positive and in line with what the competition is doing. Nobody is assessing whether it could have been much better.

    We expect only the best from our favorite athletes and we hope our children develop to their full potential but when it comes to corporate management, we remain mostly silent and accept whatever they throw at us. More →

  • 16 May
    When CEOs Become Delusional: The Case of Unilever’s Polman

    When CEOs Become Delusional: The Case of Unilever’s Polman

    • Unilever CEO Polman declared himself more competent than Buffet just because Unilever has outperformed Berkshire in the last 8 years. The funny thing is, Unilever outperformed thanks to Buffett.
    • Not only that, but Berkshire outperformed Unilever on revenue and earnings while at equal valuations, Berkshire would also largely outperform.
    • The 8-year bull market has clearly gotten into some CEOs’ heads. This creates a very dangerous situation for long term shareholder value creation.

    Introduction

    In an interview with Jim Cramer, I was thunderstruck to hear Unilever’s CEO (NYSE: UL), Paul Polman, tell the world that his returns have been better in the last 8 years than Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway (NYSE: BRK.A, BRK.B). More →

  • 15 May
    Why You Shouldn’t Love Dividends

    Why You Shouldn’t Love Dividends

    • It’s human nature to like immediate compensation. When it comes in the form of a dividend, even better.
    • However, there are far more disadvantages than advantages. Dividends are another indication of how irrational markets are.
    • We can’t even imagine what Microsoft or Apple would look like if their cash had been reinvested and not used for repurchases or dividends.

    Introduction

    When a company announces increased buybacks or hikes its dividend, the market usually reacts very positively. However, there are some people that aren’t so enthusiastic about dividends and especially buybacks as they see the former as a poor allocation of the company’s cash and the later as a fast way to destroy shareholder value. In this article, we’ll analyze why dividends aren’t as good as they seem at first sight. More →

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